GRIP's Fundamental Options

1. GRIP's main aims are research, information and training on peace, defence and disarmament issues in order to improve international security in Europe and throughout the world. GRIP focuses on how the arms proliferation operates and how security and defence needs are assessed. GRIP is independent and pluralist, conducting its scientific research scrupulously. 

2. The majority of GRIP’s activities are dedicated to the European Union (EU) and its member states’ efforts in the field of cooperation with developing countries in order to improve their security in a perspective of sustainable development. GRIP also studies the EU and its member states’ role in the international stability and security, notably within the frame of conflicts prevention and peaceful resolution. 

3. GRIP is pluralist and aims to contribute to observance of the values defined in the United Nations Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. GRIP's activities are therefore mainly concerned with the following values and concepts: the search for common, global security; the conflicts prevention and peaceful resolution; co-operation between states; a multilateral approach towards international security; solidarity between industrialised and developing countries; North-South dialogue; a constant co-operation with civil society; respect for minorities; respect for human rights and democracy; and an improvement of human security. 

4. GRIP is independent of any public or private organisation, movement or institution. Its activities aim to enlighten, inform and educate citizens about the collective choices made by conflicts’ actors, states and the international community. The goal of GRIP's action is to strengthen the role of the individual in the democratic policy-making process of nations, the European Union and international institutions in terms of international security and development. 

5. GRIP's aims of pluralism and independence such as defined above are intended to permeate the structures of its organisation, programmes, information, research methods and funding of activities. 

6. GRIP is engaged in both research and information work, which are closely inter-related. Accurate information must be based on rigorous research work. Conversely, however, research is only useful if it is used to properly inform the public. GRIP's activities must therefore be understood as “on-going education” of the public in the real sense. 

7. GRIP’s research work is articulated around the issues of arms proliferation and arms control, conflicts’ prevention and peaceful resolution mechanisms, as well as defence and security systems. GRIP studies the decision-making processes governing the arms trade, analysing in particular all aspects of the internal dynamics of the arms proliferation. This mission aims to improve defence and security systems in Europe and throughout the world. 

8. The specific topics covered by GRIP are: defence systems, institutions and doctrines in Europe and around the world, the new threats to international security, reduction in nuclear and conventional weapons, disarmament negotiations, the development of military spending, arms production and the concentration of defence industries, arms exports (particularly to third world countries), the link between security and development, the impact of defence policies on development in third world countries, conflicts’ prevention, peace-keeping operations, the improvement of human security, the fight against arms trafficking and small arms proliferation in developing countries, and the impact of climate change and resource depletion on collective security. 

9. GRIP is contributing towards the achievement of European unity, and helping to work towards the development of a stable, peaceful and efficient European defence and security policy, consistent with the EU development cooperation policy in order to improve international security in Europe and throughout the world. 

10. GRIP's research and studies are conducted using scientific methods so as to permit the most disciplined approach possible to the realities studied. Regular international co-operation with other research centres is considered essential in order to co-ordinate research efforts. GRIP seeks plentiful advice and ensures that it has the co-operation of specialists and experts in the various scientific disciplines concerned.

(June 2009)